IGF, Internet, News

IETF fellowships from IIREF

IIREF provides fellowship to attend IETF events. Intended applicants are requested to follow this sections and register. IIREF is providing fellowship for IETF96.

IIREF invites applications from qualified internet professionals from Academia, Industries, Research labs for participation in upcoming IETF Events.

Eligibility Criteria:

Applicant should be an Indian national and should be above 18 years of age.
Prior contributions to IETF working groups or mailing lists will be an added advantage.
Regular technical contributions to IIREF will be an additional advantage.

For more information: http://iiref.in/fellowship

Click Here to apply.

(the above is extract from the IIREF web page, as noticed based on information from a mailing list)

Future of Internet, IGF, Internet, News

Nextgen@ICANN fellowships

ICANN, nextgen
Application Round Opens for nextgen@icann

Internet Corporation of Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) is looking for the ‘next generation’ of individuals who are interested in becoming more actively engaged in their own regional communities as well as taking part in the future growth of global Internet policy.  Important work is happening every day at ICANN; if you are ready to start your journey, read the information below to see if you are eligible for THIS ICANN Meeting.

Prospective members of the NextGen@ICANN initiative must be:

  • Living or studying in the region of the respective ICANN meeting and between the ages of 18 and 30.These regions are determined by ICANN based on the Global Stakeholder Engagement regions. Note: for those over the age of 30, be sure to apply for the ICANN Fellowship program if you meet the Fellowship criteria (Learn More).
  • Able to spend the time allotted for the ICANN meeting, actively participating and in attendance at all required events, as noted by the organizers of NextGen.
  • Interested in Internet Governance, the future of the Internet, and other topics covered at the ICANNmeeting.
  • Willing to present a 5-10 minute project at the meeting. This could be a presentation of research you are working on or have completed, an activity you are doing related to ICANN‘s work, a website you are affiliated with that is related to ICANN‘s work, a thesis project you are working on, etc. All NextGen presentations may be attended by members of the ICANN Multistakeholder community who are in attendance at the ICANN Meeting, as well as NextGen Ambassadors and other NextGen participants.

We are now accepting applications for the ICANN56 Program to be held in Helsinki, Finland 27-30 June 2016. Click here for more information about the meeting: https://meetings.icann.org/en/helsinki56

Click here to apply to NextGen@ICANN

(Application for ICANN56 opened until 18 April 2016)

Future of Internet, IGF, Internet, Multistakeholder Model, News

European Summer School of Internet Governance announces its 2016 week long program

Euro SSIG  MEISSEN / GERMANY, 16 JULY – 23 JULY 2016

European Summer School of Internet Governance
European Summer School of Internet Governance

Do you want to understand the multilayer, multi player mechanisms of Internet Governance? Do you want to know what the political, economic, social and legal implications of Internet Governance are? Do you want to learn what is behind cryptic acronyms like ICANN, RIR, DNS, ccTLD, gTLD, iDN, IPv6, ISP, IETF, W3C, IAB, WHOIS, GAC, IGF, WGIG and WSIS? Do want to get more detailed information about technical Internet standards, protocols, codes, domain names, IP addresses, registries and registrars? Are you interested to look deeper into the opportunities and risks of the emerging global Internet Economy? Do you want to become an Internet Governance leader of tomorrow?

Than you should apply for the “10th European Summer School on Internet Governance” (EuroSSIG). The 2016 Summer School offers a unique multidisciplinary high level 48 hours academic programme. The programme is a well balanced mixture of theoretical lectures with world leading academics as well as practical presentations from well known experts working directly in the technical community, the market or in policy. It offers unique opportunities for learning in a multi stakeholder environment, which includes also intense and individual interactive communication with faculty members and fellows from all over the world. The faculty is chaired by Prof. Wolfgang Kleinwächter, University of Aarhus.

APPLICATION

Applications will be accepted both from students and individuals working in the private sector, in government or in civil society groups from all over the world. Application criteria are a basic academic degree or relevant practical experiences. The full course fee is 1000 EUR (plus 19% VAT), but we offer reduced fee for master students of 500 EUR (plus 19% VAT). It includes, next to the lecture programme:

  • seven nights accommodation in the guest rooms of the academy
  • breakfast, lunch, dinner, coffee
  • one evening reception in the “Meissen Porcelain Manufactory”
  • gala dinner in the historic wine restaurant “Vincenz Richter”
  • boat trip on the river Elbe
  • free WiFi access and
  • all teaching material.

FELLOWSHIP PROGRAMME

We can offer students from developing countries an opportunity to apply for the global fellowship programme.  These fellowships are limited and do not all include travel costs. Therefore we kindly ask you to indicate if you are able to cover your travel costs.

If you are interested in the European Summer School on Internet Governance (EuroSSIG), please apply by using the online application form. For any additional questions please contact Sandra Hoferichter the coordinator of the Summer School.

Core Internet Values, IGF, Internet, News, technology

Internet Technologies evolve to enable Interplanetary Networking

The initial Inter Planetary Networking technologies have been developed by Vint Cerf and others.  In Interplanetary networking the time delay (latency) and the lack of continuous network connectivity (as for example, waiting for the next satellite to come into the communication range) are problems that needed to be solved.  Hence the Interplanetary Network has to be Delay Tolerant and Disruption tolerant, whereas on the Internet, by the present protocols, the packets would be dropped when there is a line disruption or any abnormal delay.

Interplanetary Networks concept diagram by IPNSIG
Interplanetary Networking or Delay and Disruption Tolerant Networks

The experimental protocols have been developed by members of the Delay & Disruption Tolerant Networking Research Group (which operates under the aegis of the Internet Research Task Force).

The Internet Society has shared an update from NASA’s Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate’s (HEOMD) on its Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program.

While much of the focus is on a human mission to Mars, there are also signs of NASA’s increased commitment to Delay & Disruption Tolerant Networking (DTN).

Current Activities:

  • Disruption Tolerant Networking (DTN): Infusion of store and forward communications protocols into NASA and international missions.

Recent Accomplishments:

  • Demonstrated supervisory control of ESA Eurobot from the International Space Station (ISS using) DTN.
  • Agreement with KARI (the South Korean Space Agency) to conduct DTN experiments.

With an increased dependency upon robotic missions to pave the way for a human mission to Mars, and increasing realization that the data is the mission, these are encouraging signs that DTN is gathering momentum as a critical component of guaranteeing mission success.

The full update is available for download at:  https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/files/3-Status_of_AES.pdf  See slide 17

For a better understanding of the basics of DTN watch this video:

 

DNSSEC, Future of Internet, IGF, Internet, IPv6, new gTLD, News, Open Source, technology

Y2K20: Opportunities in design and testing for freelance application developers, small IT companies, medium, large and huge.

It was not uncommon to find the earliest of the Web Application Developers to assume that all domain names would end in .com, all email addresses would follow the format @xyz.com. While developers took into account newer domain names such as .info in due course, most continued to design applications to accept Domain names and email addresses in ASCII just as software developers in the 80s assumed that it would be unnecessary to have any more than two digits to denote the year, which led to the famous Y2K issue towards the year 2000.

y2k20
Imaginary logo of y2k20, a name that does not exist

Now there are new Top Level Domain Names (such as .family and .game) and Internationalized Domain Names (in various native non-ascii scripts of India and the world, such as .??????? and .???? (I typed India in Tamil and Devanagiri, displays here as ???) as well as Internationalized email Internet Domain Names that would allow users to have addresses in their native scripts.

If a browser or a form in a webpage limits acceptance of domain names or email addresses with a rule such as “a domain name must be in English and end with .com, or .net or .org” or “an email address must be in English or numerals” then it is archaic.

It is a problem far larger in its dimensions than the Y2K problem of year 2000 which kept the IT community of the entire world talking. On this problem of “Universal Acceptance” there appears to be inadequate attention to the problem in global public interest as well as to the commercial opportunities it presents for enterprising Developers and Corporations. This might emerge to be a huge commercial vertical in itself in view of the Design changes to be brought about and in terms of the testing requirements. #Deity #NASSCOM #WIPRO #TiE #TCS #Cognizant (If you are from a different country, please feel free to rewrite this post to suit your country and publish it. This post is not copyrighted.)

For more information, follow the publicly archived, transparent discussions in the IETF forum, at ICANN and at the Internet Society on this issue. You could also write to isocindiachennai (At) gmail (dot) com for additional pointers or any clarification. Or ask your Executives at a higher level to take part in ICANN meetings that are open and held as multi-stakeholder global meetings. And also join the Internet Society India Chennai Chapter. Such participation would lead you to positive involvement in the global Internet and also connect you to business opportunities not only in the y2k20 (there is no such term, the term is coined to describe the issue and the opportunity) but also in DNSSEC, IPv6 transition, Internet of Things (IoT) and new gTLDs.

What does the phrase “Universal Acceptance” mean?

“Universal Acceptance of domain names and email addresses” (or just “Universal Acceptance”, or even “UA”, for short) means that all apps and online services should accept all Internet domain names and email addresses equally.

Universal Acceptance is an important concept these days because the Internet is changing. One way that it is changing is that addresses no longer need to be composed of ASCII characters. (ASCII characters are the 127 Latin-script letters, numerals and punctuation marks that are dominant on the Internet today. All the characters in this document so far have been ASCII characters.)

Most people on earth are not native speakers of languages which use the ASCII characters, so moving from a character set limited to 127 characters to an alternate which can support more than one million characters is essential for those people to fully use and benefit from the Internet. This alternate is called Unicode.

Another way that the Internet is changing is by allowing lots of new domain names. Not only are there simply more of them, but some are longer than any of the older domain names and many of them use the same Unicode system mentioned above.

Note: “Universal Acceptance” is sometimes confused with “Universal Access” or “Universal Accessibility”; those phrases refer to connecting everyone on earth to the Internet, and to building Internet-connected systems for all differently-abled people on earth, respectively. Universal acceptance is limited to domain names and email addresses.

A special group called “Universal Acceptance Steering group (UASG) has been created to work on issues related to Universal Acceptance. UASG doesn’t work on anything else (e.g. Universal Access or Universal Accessibility).

How does an app or an online service support Universal Acceptance?

Software and online services support Universal Acceptance when they offer the following capabilities:

A. Can accept any domain name or email name as an input from a user interface, from a document, or from another app or service

B. Can validate and process any domain name or email name

C. Can store any domain name or email name

D. Can output any domain name or email name to a user interface, to a document, or to another app or service

Unfortunately, older apps and online services don’t always offer those capabilities. Sometimes they lack support for Unicode; sometimes they make wrong assumptions about new domain names, or even assume they don’t exist. Sometimes they support Universal Acceptance in some features but not in all.

How can Universal Acceptance be measured?

Universal Acceptance can be measured in a few ways.

1. Source code reviews and unit testing

2. Manual testing

3. Automated testing

#1 means inspecting the source code and verifying that only the correct programming techniques, software libraries and interfaces (AKA “APIs”) have been used, then verifying that the app or service works by testing against specific test cases for the capabilities A-D listed above. #1 is only practical for app developers and online service providers.

UASG is reaching out directly to the community of app developers and the largest online service providers to encourage them to perform source code reviews and testing to determine the level of Universal Acceptance in their offerings. UASG is also providing a list of criteria which can be used to develop test cases for the capabilities A-D listed above.

#2 can be done by anyone, but it’s labor-intensive. Examples of #2 would include submitting an email address when registering for an online service and verifying that it has been accepted. Since there are lots of potential online services to sign up for, and lots of potential new email address combinations, one must pick and choose which combinations of app, services, email address and/or domain name to test.

UASG is developing a list of top web sites, apps, email addresses and domain names suitable for testing.

#3 requires up-front technical work, but is more scalable to large measuring and monitoring efforts. An example of #3 is the recent gTLD investigation performed by APNIC on behalf of ICANN. <http://www.potaroo.net/reports/Universal-Acceptance/UA-Report.pdf >

UASG is investigating methods of automated testing for Universal Acceptance and will share these as they are developed.